Politics

Clinton v Trump take two – tensions grow in penultimate debate.

Threats, insults and accusations dominated discussion on Sunday’s debate, but was there any mention of policy?

By Charlotte Gehrke

Democratic Nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican Candidate Donald Trump were led in to the second presidential debate by ABC news reporter Martha Raddatz and CNN news anchor Anderson Cooper at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9th.

This debate was held in the “town meeting” format meaning that some of the debate questions were directly posed by audience members at Washington University while others were asked by the moderators, selected through the website Open Debate Coalition.

Hillary Clinton was named the unofficial winner in the four so called “quality” polls. According to a CNN/ORC instant poll, 57 percent of debate watchers agreed with this and only 34 percent believed Trump to be the winner of the discussion. However, the result of the YouGov poll was a lot closer. 47% of respondants believed that Clinton won the debate whereas 42% saw Trump as the winner.

One of the major topics discussed in both debates was the issue of taxes. While Trump explained his plans to decrease taxes from 35 to 15 percent saying that he would be “cutting taxes for the middle class”, Clinton stated that she would raise taxes for the wealthy.

When asked how she would tackle issues surrounding Syria and its ally, Russia, Clinton said she would instate to no-fly and safe zones in Syria.

When asked the same question, Trump avoided answering. instead retorting with insults and accusations.

The most controversial issue of the evening, however, was a tape from 2005 that had surfaced before the debate recording Trump talking to Access Hollywood host, Billy Bush, about women using extremely vulgar and derogative terms.

Trump apologized describing the conversation as “locker talk”. The Republican party members, however, saw this as an indicator to distance themselves even further from Trump by diverting funding from his campaign and spending it on S enate races instead.

Trump responded to the actions taken by the Republican party by calling them “self-righteous hypocrites” and proclaiming to a reporter of the Wall Street Journal that there is “zero chance I’ll quit”.

In the past week the majority of news outlets have predicted that Clinton will win the forthcoming Presidential election easily. This has led to Trump supporters looking for new ways to get their candidate elected.

A poll study on the website FiveThirtyEight found that if only males were allowed to vote, Trump would be elected as President. This observation has caused Trump supporters to run a Twitter campaign to repeal the 19th amendment, which gives women the right to vote.

The third and final debate will take place on October 19.

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