Film & TV

TEXAS CHAINSAW 3D

REVIEWAlexandra-Daddario-in-Texas-Chainsaw-3D-2013-Movie-Image-2-660x360

Texas Chainsaw 3d

Director: John Luessenshop

Starring: Alexandra Daddario, Tania Raymonde, Scott Eastwood. 

Rating: 2.5/5

Despite being the seventh film in the franchise, Texas Chainsaw 3D actually serves as a direct sequel to Tobe Hooper’s original 1974 slasher film. The original Texas Chainsaw Massacre, while heavily controversial at its release, is now seen as one of the best and most terrifying horror films ever created. This sequel however fails to reach the high standards set by its predecessor, and is instead a generic, barely above average slasher film.

The plot of this film revolves around a young woman named Heather (Daddario) finding out that her grandmother has passed away and left everything she owned to her. Unbeknownst to Heather, she is in fact related to the murderous Sawyer family, the antagonists of the original film. She sets out to find out the truth about her past along with her boyfriend Ryan (Songz) and two of her friends.

In true slasher fashion, the cast are viciously murdered one by one. The gore is as brutal as you would expect, and it goes without saying that this film isn’t for the faint hearted. The tension however, is not as masterfully built as in the original and the film seems to lack the same daring, visceral quality. A scene in the final third of the film is set in a crowded carnival, a setting which ruins the sense of isolation and dread that should have been present at this stage in the movie.

There are few scenes of genuine tension, however they are often cut short and the eagerness of the director to ‘cut to the chase’ tends to ruin the suspense of the film. The main redeeming factor of the film is its final act, which takes the film in a twisted direction not often seen in many slashers. Nevertheless, its twisted story is not enough to save the film. The lack of building tension, along with some truly bizarre character motivations, leaves you feeling like this film could have been made a lot better. In fact, back in 1974, it was.

Ayyub Maadani

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