Columnist

Big Knickers, Blue Soup, and Being Yourself: Bridget Jones Can Teach Us

Phoebe Grinter – Columnist
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In the picture-perfect Insta era that we live in, I decided to highlight an often forgotten female role model.

When we think of modern female role models, there are a few names that spring to mind. Michelle Obama, Greta Thunberg, and Queen Bey just to name a few. However, a name that is often shamefully left off the list is one of the most relatable and, despite being fictional, one of the most real role models that young women today can learn a lot from. Her name is Bridget Jones. Whether it be following in her footsteps or using her as an example of how not to behave, Bridget Jones is a queen in her own right, and deserves the respect she has earned. 

A heroine of modern-day romantic fiction, Bridget Jones teaches us many valuable life lessons, from learning to love yourself and not change for anyone, to making sure you change your massive granny pants before reaching ‘crucial moment’ with that boy you’ve fancied for ages. In the modern era of perfect profiles and Insta filters, even the slightest imperfection can feel like complete failure. Those of us who are struggling through life, taking one decent selfie once every six months and recycling that one banging outfit for three different events, may begin to feel inadequate. Luckily for us, Bridget is there to remind us that it’s okay to not have your life totally together yet. 

I can relate to Bridget on many levels. Like her, I am a bit of a binge drinker and suffer from verbal diarrhoea when nervous. Although I have never accidentally made blue soup, I am hopeless in the kitchen, and unfortunately, I don’t have the supportive and beautiful Mark Darcy telling me that it’ll all be okay. All I have is the smoke alarm screaming at me. 

Though she encounters some dickheads on the way, Bridget is lucky enough to find her perfect man eventually. She teaches us not to fall for the handsome player who expects us to be someone we’re not. Instead, Bridget let herself be an independent, career-driven woman until her Mr Darcy came into her life. She teaches us not to settle, but to wait for the right person who will like us very much, just as we are. 

Bridget teaches us that no matter what life throws at you, as long as you are surrounded by good people, you will be able to get through it. Bridget and I are similar in that we both have amazing friends that adore us. Whenever I have good news, bad news, want to gossip or want a should to cry on, my mates are there, usually carrying chocolate and wine. 

Along with death and paying taxes, familial embarrassment is one of life’s certainties. Bridget and her parents teach us that although family life can be rocky at times, in the end families support and love each other unconditionally. So next time you feel your cheeks burning red with embarrassment as your mum does something incredibly embarrassing in public, just thank your lucky stars she not the face of ‘Have it Oeuf’ Wise Crack egg peeler.

Another valuable life lesson Bridget taught us is that first impressions aren’t as important as everyone made you believe. If Bridget’s experiences have taught us anything it’s to reserve judgement until you get to know someone and don’t judge a book by its cover – or its hideous Christmas jumper. 

Sometimes you turn up to a family party dressed as a slutty bunny and sometimes you slide down a fireman’s pole before your cue and your whole arse is shown to the world. Like Bridget, we all make mistakes and embarrass ourselves. These imperfections that we love and admire in Bridget are the ones we find difficult to love about ourselves. Bridget sets an example for young people today that it’s okay – normal in fact – to not be perfect. The most perfect thing you can be is yourself. If you are yourself, and love yourself, so will everyone else. Big knickers, blue soup, and all.

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