Food

National Potato Chip Day

Yesterday was National Potato Chip day, and to celebrate this tasty, salty snack many of us have grown up with, we asked our contributors all about their favourite ways to eat crisps!

Crisp Sandwiches – by Clara Boon

When the potato chip (more commonly known to us as crisps) first came to Britain in the early part of the 20th Century I bet people didn’t realise how versatile they would be decades later. An easy and quick fix, or part of a lunchtime nibble– the impact of the crisp has revolutionised the snack section on supermarket shelves. Each year crisp companies create even more weird and wacky crisp flavours, such as ‘Turkey and Stuffing’, ‘Marmite’, ‘Onion Bhaji’, and even ‘Tomato Ketchup’.

I crunched my way through the sandwich and from that moment – I have never looked back.

Surprisingly, crisps can be used in a multitude of recipes – such as crisp sandwiches. When I was younger, I remember my Dad making me one for the first time. I was unsure that this could work. Crisps in a sandwich shouldn’t be tasty. He spread the butter over the white slice of bread and then began to make a layer of Walkers Salt and Vinegar (or sometimes even cheese and onion) crisps on top. I crunched my way through the sandwich and from that moment – I have never looked back. I would regularly ask my Dad to make me one after school. Even though I knew the formula myself, it always tasted better when he made them.

Crisps have always been a quick-fix for an after school treat. As soon as I came home my mother would pass me a bowl of crisps (preferably Sensations Thai Chilli Crisps) and some Sour Cream and Chive dip. Other healthier ‘dip-able’ foods are available like wands of carrot or celery, but there’s something about the spicy thai chilli crisp and cool dip combo that just hits the spot.

All this talk of food has made me actually quite peckish. Do you know what? In honour of my Dad, I think I might make myself a crisp sandwich!

Nachos – by Abi Edwards

Image by Abi Edwards

One of my favourite foods in the whole entire world is nachos. Although not exactly made out of potato chips, it’s still a great way to use crisps to create a delicious treat. The popular Mexican dish consists of tortilla chips, salsa, cheese and various toppings, and my boyfriend and I religiously order the dish whenever we see them on the menu in a restaurant.

The dish is so versatile and can be enjoyed as a comforting snack, a hangover cure or something to nibble on when you’re out for drinks. The only down side is that it’s hard to eat them without making a mess, but it’s so worth it. You can also add things such as chilli con carne to make them even more delicious. You can make them veggie by simply leaving them as they are or adding veggie chilli, for example, or you could make them vegan by adding dairy free cheese and even BBQ jackfruit.

Nachos are also one of the easiest dishes to make. Simply choose your tortilla chips (I use plain or blue Doritos), layer them on a microwavable plate with some salsa and cheese, put in the microwave for a few minutes until the cheese melts, then add your desired toppings. People sometimes add guacamole, sour cream and jalapeños, but you can add whichever toppings you want to suit your spice tolerance. Needless to say, they’ll be the first thing I order when Mark Drakeford opens up restaurants again.

Cottage Pie Topping – by Hannah Penwright

Growing up, my taste in crisps was as boring as it could get: ready salted was my favourite flavour and if I had ‘Salt ‘n’ Shake’ in my lunchbox, I knew it was going to be a good day. If I was feeling wild, I might go rogue and swap to roast chicken every so often, or even the occasional Wotsit. But anything with a strong flavour such as beef and onion, salt and vinegar or pickled onion were too much for my tastes, and I hated it when my friends would come in and eat them next to me (although I got my own back by taking a liking to tuna sandwiches in middle school).

If I was feeling wild, I might go rogue and swap to roast chicken every so often, or even the occasional Wotsit.

However, all of this went out the window when it came to sprucing up one of my least favourite dinners that my parents seemed to make far too often. Cottage pie. The running theme of mush throughout was very off-putting; even the addition of undercooked carrots couldn’t save it. But all of this changed when I went for dinner at my grandparent’s house, and my grandma brought out her version of cottage pie.

When she announced that they were cheese and onion flavour, I was dubious: I’d never ventured into such exotic crisp choice before.

Instead of the usual failed attempt at a bit of crunch by fluffing up the mash to caramelize the top, my grandma had lovingly sprinkled the top all over with crushed up crisps. When she announced that they were cheese and onion flavour, I was dubious: I’d never ventured into such exotic crisp choice before. However, my taste buds were pleasantly surprised by the way the strong cheddar and onion flavours married with the gravy and potato- it truly was a match made in heaven. It quickly became a staple in my house too, with myself and my siblings always willing to help out if it meant we got to throw bags of crisps around to crush them, in what was definitely the most effective method.

css.php